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Miscommunication & Trust

The customer’s first impression of your company may be determined by you – or your email message. The way you communicate will reflect how others perceive you. Keep and maintain a trusting relationship with your customers by being aware of the type of jargon and technical language you use when communicating.

Your may have internal customers, external customers, or both. These customers put their trust in you. In some professions (such as doctor, financial consultant, banker, CPA, attorney), you have a very specific role as confidant. Regardless of your occupation, recognize that trust refers to how you communicate information, as well as to the information itself.

It’s not just about the information you send. It is also about how the information is communicated. If you send a customer information in an email message that is misinterpreted, you will lose that trust factor.

Trust is difficult enough to earn initially. And, trust is virtually impossible to regain, once it’s lost.

Keep in mind that “trust” may not be the reason a client hires you or a customer buys from you. It may have nothing to do with the initial purchasing decision.

Yet, lack of trust is a viable reason for customers to take their business elsewhere. Lack of trust can also be a factor in firing someone in a corporate environment. Your customer (or your boss) may not even realize that trust is an important factor in your professional relationship – until it is gone.

Email can be an effective tool for building and maintaining trust in relationships with customers and colleagues. You don’t want the use of jargon or confusing terminology in emails to jeopardize that trust.

Remember that your use of technical terms and industry jargon may offend the receiver. It may appear rude or condescending to the reader. That, in turn, can cause embarrassment or even expensive mistakes.

Avoid technical terms and jargon, unless you are certain the reader will understand what you mean. That will lead to healthy, trusting, cost-effective relationships with customers and coworkers.

Submitted by:

Kelly Watkins

Kelly J. Watkins, MBA, Louisville, KY. Visit: http://www.KeepCustomers.com to order, Email Etiquette Made Easy (a comprehensive guide filled with exercises & examples) or for tips on communication & customer service! (812) 246-2424 or kelly@keepcustomers.com.




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