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Barbacoa – Grilled Sheep From Mexico

Barbacoa – the name itself sounds as if it is time to celebrate. It is an open fire grilling process where a whole sheep is made to roast slowly so that each fleshy part acquires that flabbergasting taste of barbeque bonfire. However, the sheep can also be grilled traditionally in a pit covered with leaves. This barbeque specialty was developed in Mexico just after the Spanish conquest and it was referred to as Barbacoa de cabeza.

Regional discrimination in the art of cooking

In U.S, some portions of the head of the cow become the item to be grilled. In Northern Mexico, again it is the head of the cow, though goat meat or Cabrito is more preferred here. Lamb is the choice of the Central Mexicans and it is Cochinita Pibil (pit-style pork) in traditional Yucatan gastronomy dictionary.

Barbacoa and Barbeque

The word barbeque is an adoption from the word barbacoa. In both cases, meats are cooked following a proper grilling or roasting process. The flesh is allowed to roll well over the grilling equipment to allow the heat touch every part of the fleshy item. This helps to build that simmering and spicy experience which often makes you feel as if there is no end to an appetite.

South Texas Style Beef Barbacoa

Five brothers together make one palatable dish. Yes that’s the way it’s done. Garlic powder, black pepper, dried oregano, chili powder and salt – all mixed well and rubbed thoroughly and evenly on all sides of the meat. Your requirement is three quarts boiling water in a water pan, which allows the beef to be exposed to smoke at least for four hours and at a temperature between 225 to 275 degrees. Once you are to change the boiling water of the pan. After this is over, keep watch that the internal temperature of the beef does not exceed 160 – 170 degrees.

The next step would be to lay the beef in a foil-baking pan, seal it well with heavy-duty aluminum cover, and carefully place it in a preheated oven at a temperature of 325 degrees. The baking should continue for one hour and forty-five minutes. After everything is done just test the meat. You will see that the flesh tends to fall apart from the bone - yes, proper broiling method can really make the meat soft.

Now, it is the time to serve. The meat is chopped and shred into small pieces and then dished up with guacamole, salsa, and hot tortillas.

The queen of the Mexican bistro

Outside Mexico City, there are several places serving palatable barbacoa de borrego (lamb barbeque) and other provincial cooking varieties in a dozen of unbounded restaurants. Arroyo, one of Mexico’s famous restaurants is noted for its supply of pit-roasted barbacoa de borrego and consomme de Borrego. Such dishes are well complimented by soup made from the drippings of the roasting lamb and sheep.

Mexican barbacoa – a Mexico magnificence that can make the heat of an occasion rise to an extent when the rest of the party dance wildly with the pulsating music. When hot barbeque accompanies the heat of an occasion, nothing else is required to make the party more enjoying.

Submitted by:

Chris McCarthy

For condiments for your next grilling experience such as hot sauce, bbq sauce visit Chris McCarthy's InsaneChicken's Hot Sauce Store.




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