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A Doggy Affair

For a dog loving girls “a Doggy Affair” party is hard to avoid. Arranging Doggy Affair party is a great fun and exciting for all the dog lovers young girls.

Most youngsters love dogs and Joan and her crowd were no exception. For that reason he decided to make her birthday party a "Doggy Affair." When she invited her friends she asked each of them to bring a snapshot of her dog and be prepared to give a two-minute talk on the virtues of that particular breed of dog. Immediately the gang was interested.

As each guest arrived Joan handed her an envelope which contained paper letters. These letters when placed in the right order spelled out a dog's name such as Rover, Brownie, Scotch, Lassie, etc. This is an excellent starter as it gives each newcomer something to do while the others are arriving. As soon as each one had figured out her dog's name it was written on a slip of paper and pinned on her and became her name for the evening. One plump gal turned out to be "Lassie," and the sober scholar of the bunch became "Soot," much to the crowd's delight.

The first activity of the evening was a "Handful Re-lay." The girls were divided into two teams. Fifteen dog biscuits were given to the first player in each team. At a signal she put all of them on the floor in front of the person next to her in line. Each player had to have all the dog biscuits in her hands when she passed them. If a player spilled some of them in the passing, the line started over again. The team that finished first won the relay.

Next Joan passed a hat containing slips of paper. Each guest drew one. On each slip was written a situation to be acted out by the person drawing it in bow-wow language only.

Here are some good situations:

- Bing Crosby singing a sentimental ballad.
- A bashful boy explaining to teacher why he was late to school.
- A boy teasing to play out after dark with the crowd.
- A mother scolding her small son for breaking a window.
- A father refusing to increase his son's allowance.

The trick was to guess what situation was being portrayed by the person barking through her assignment. The one doing the best job of explaining her situation in dog language was given a bag of dog biscuits.

The following game took a great deal of wind. The players stood in two lines. At the head of each line was placed a stack of No. 2 paper sacks; one for each player. At a given signal the first person in each line picked up a bag, ran to the end of her line, blowing it up as she ran and popped it on the back of the end girl as she stepped into line behind her. If the bag failed to burst, she blew it up and tried again. As soon as the explosion was heard the second person in line took her turn with a sack. The side finishing first won a picture of a dog clipped from a magazine cover.

The party becomes more funny and enjoyable when the children start acting the situation in bow-wow language. It is important to remember that no kid is left out to use bow-wow language. Everyone should be given equal time to play their own role.

Submitted by:

Rehan Husain

Mitch Johnson is a regular writer for http://www.kids-games-n-crafts.com/ , http://www.mycomicbookshub.info/ , http://www.goodbudgetholiday.info/




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